Meet our New Trainer Rife Hilgartner

Rife grew up in Baltimore but has lived in Colorado for the last 20 years, primarily in the mountains. He is actively involved in racing in the off road triathlon XTERRA, which is composed of a 1.5 km swim, 30km of mountain biking, and 10 km of running. Rife is very involved with coaching triathlon and teaching Pilates, helping people balance themselves out and move better.

An important part of programming for Rife is strength training, which he believes “is an important component to your total body health. Most people just want to move really well. If you are playing with your kids, you want to be able to play and pick them up properly.”

As Rife points out, everyone is an athlete to some degree, it is important to be involved. While Rife specializes in helping clients train for marathons and cycling, his interest is in helping others train indoors to better prepare for their outside adventures.

Training Indoors for Outside

Being strong indoors can carry over for life. This can be as arduous as skiing, bike riding, running trails, or even just playing in the back yard with your children.

Denver is an active city and the members here at Greenwood Athletic Club want to continue to be active for a long time. “I’m one of those people who believes that age is just a number. With the proper programs and training, you can keep strength, health, fitness and athleticism for your entire life.”

One major area to focus on is the Posterior chain, which is from the back of your head to the bottom of your feet. It’s important to keep this area strong because it’s a major support system. The powerhouse muscles and your core are just as important as that chain, they tie right into that.

Those two systems within the body are important to make strong and to help with posture. A lot of this strengthening is part of the foundation for “Pilates for Dudes,” which demonstrates how Pilates is good for everyone.  Joseph Pilates originally created the work, creating flexibility with length, strength and control. Pilates helps strengthen in muscles you might not have even known existed. What you learn here will translate into other areas.

It’s also important to incorporate in different areas of training and movements, such as weights, yoga, Pilates, cardio, etc. This helps to create different movement patterns and allows you to train different energy systems of the body. If you are spending one day on the treadmill, spend the next on the stair master and a third in the weight room. This means you are channeling different areas to make changes in your body, day-to-day attitude and feelings about life.

Rife is available for one-on-one appointments here at Greenwood Athletic Club. Please feel free to message him HERE or check out his personal website howfittraining.com.

@Instagram https://www.instagram.com/howfittraining/

@Facebook https://www.facebook.com/rife.hilgartner

Meet our New Trainer Bri Gerwitz!

Bri_GerwitzWhile Bri Gerwitz grew up playing sports, it was her weight loss journey starting in 2010 that really helped to inspire her fitness career. The drive of that experience pushed her to want to learn more about the fitness world and to educate and share with other her knowledge and experience. Her trainer interests lie primarily with functional movement orientation, and while she’s certified in Yoga, her interest also lies in helping others who are interested in doing extreme sports. Here are some of her suggestions for movements that will help you conquer the great outdoors.

Rock Climbing

It is important to try out movements before engaging in activities. With Rock Climbing, since you do so much pulling with rock climbing, it’s important to do core stabilization with pushing. This means you will be balancing the body as well as balancing the muscles. To help with this you want to incorporate in some short circuit work such as single leg deadlifts or single leg box jumps. As Bri points out, “you don’t always have a good two-foot grasp while you are rock climbing. This means being able to utilize one foot in a dynamic and then controlled manner is going to help get into and out of a situation on a rock.”

From there, focus on the core, doing exercises such as planks and isometric holds which you might use while rock climbing; this allows you to condition your body for holding. Bri also suggests some dynamic moves while in a plank position, such as skier abs or rotations. These moves are demonstrative, and working on your core in the gym will help you utilize that power.

Kayaking

Here you want to think about a full body workout with oblique’s . It’s important to strengthen your oblique’s with twisting to get a good hit snap to roll back over from a dive/roll out of the kayak. Exercise wise, this might include some cable tucks and rotations from upper and lower body. High rows and chest flies will also help you keep leverage and power when you are awkwardly trying to maneuver around rocks, helping you use the full range of motion from your shoulders.

You also want to focus on chest and shoulders, especially with mobility. It will help to bring in some yoga and mobility work to strengthen these areas because when you can move in the same fashion in different directions, it forces smaller muscles to move when the larger ones are fatigued. This is why exercises such as matrix push-ups, pull ups and rows are going to prepare you outside of the gym.

 

Backpacking or Hiking a 14er

13925113_10157241740120099_6657487935517397989_nHere it’s important to build your lower body strength, such as incorporating in single leg lunges and balancing with weights during your workouts. This helps you get used to a path. Balancing work will help with your footing, when there’s so much exposure outdoors to the unknown. It also will help you deal with what it’s like to be up above the tree line. If you are prepared for the uneasy and shifting of your surroundings with the rocks and boulders, that is going to help you feel better prepared. Endurance and strength are also essential, which means building your core strength. You might engage with some balance reaches, on one leg with a plate or kettlebell to reach down and all the way back up. This helps activate your muscles, and will lead to more strength within the movement.

Bri is now available to work with our Greenwood Athletic Clients one-one-one. Please contact her HERE, or add her on social media: Facebook, Instagram

 

You can also check out her Flex & Function class, which works to strengthen superficial muscles and deep core muscles.

Flex and Function

Recreational Cycling Coaching

Jennifer Schumm

In the 11 years that I have been riding my bike, I have found cycling to be one of the things I am most passionate about in life. I love where the bike takes me to and what all I get to see in the world ON MY BIKE!  The most amazing scenery one could ever experience happens on a bike.  The bike, besides bringing wonderful happiness and passion to enrich our lives, also offers another tool of exercise that is quite euphoric! No wonder so many people love riding a bike!

Jennschumm1I have found in all my years of riding and racing, the people who need the most help from a coaching standpoint are recreational cyclists. I have been asked many questions throughout my years of cycling about things like: “how do I know when to get out of the saddle and for how long?”, “How do I shift gears while riding in my drops and when do I shift gears? “, “How do I know which gearing  to use on different hills and terrain and how do I learn varying techniques and positions for riding my bike in order to be the most efficient cyclist, all while having fun? “How do I ride with groups and how do I learn the skills required to ride with groups?”

What’s it like getting started with a recreational cycling coach? When I first start working with a recreational rider, we go on a bike ride of their choice, and I just ride with them, looking at their position on their bike, how their bike fits them, etc. I make recommendations based on what I see, and then we go from there. I see how they ride on the flats, short hills, long hills, sustained climbs, etc. and I make suggestions as to the position they should ride in and gearing they should choose as we are riding all these various terrains. It can be as simple as me telling them what gear to be in, what position to be on in and for how long, and then what position to change into and gearing to change into as we ride.  I also have them work on varying cadence and effort drills as well as attacks, sprinting, power efforts, pace lining, descending skills, and skills required to ride with other people and in groups.

When I work with a client, I want to teach you which tools you need in your toolbox for bike riding, as well as show you how to ride better by yourself but also how to ride better with other people and groups. These are all skills that need to be learned. I also teach skills for descending, pack riding, pace lining, sprinting, attacking etc. These are all important skills that I believe recreational riders need to learn too because you never know when you are riding with a group of friends and somebody attacks you OR you are the one who attacks them because you want to get to the top of the hill first? It’s always fun to be competitive.

When I work one-on-one with you, I will suggest certain drills to work on based on what your weakest areas are, which I want to encourage you to improve on. I will give you specific drills to do while on the ride. This is great because its personal training, but on the bike.

JennandDadI also have people say to me,: “I just want to be faster on my bike so I can beat my friends in the local century, or get up squaw pass or high grade faster, “I just don’t want to be the last person that gets dropped riding in our group of friends,” or “I also don’t want to be completely exhausted in the middle of the ride either.”  This is why teaching a recreational cyclist all the different techniques and positions  you can ride your bike with varying  weather, temperatures, and wind conditions is SO important! Life changing! It allows you to maintain speed, maintain covering distances at a certain speed without getting dropped. Having many positions and techniques to ride your bike on all the different kinds of terrain out there on these Colorado at nationwide roads is very important. The body needs to be able to recover certain muscles while other ones are being used and vice versa. Not to mention that being able to change bike positions, technique and different cadences or different positions on the bike helps keep your body fresh and helps keep those muscles that are working, working! All this keeps fatigue at bay and FULL GAS at large!

I would also suggest if you aren’t already using it STRAVA, give it a try because it takes your recreational biking experience to a whole new level! A few new levels! Everyone likes a reason to compete and likes to show off to their friends, but they also like to compete against themselves and see that their times are improving, they’re getting more PR’s, etc. STRAVA offers results that shows how you are getting faster. Everyone loves the feeling of beating their friends or competitors on any type of terrain whether it’s a Hillclimb, Sprint to a stop sign, or lead pack that you didn’t get dropped from, the list goes on. 

RecreationCyclist flyer

Bikes are like well manicured high-octane sports cars. You are not going to drive a car like that at one speed on one terrain.   You are going to use all the cool gadgets and gizmos and toys that car is made with. Same thing on a bike. It just takes someone to show you how to use all those toys and gadgets and gizmos to go faster but also how to a have more fun and that is one thing I do.  I’m here to teach you how to get the most efficient riding out of your bike as well as the most efficient aero dynamic and overall riding experience.

 

 

I would love to work more with you, feel free to email me at jennifers@GreenwoodATC.com to learn more about how I can help take your recreation cycling to a new level!

 

The Key to Exercising? It’s Balance!

When the media describes a new fitness trend or training method, they advertise that this is the best new way to train.  Whether it is long duration/low intensity, high intensity interval training or weight training only, each proclaim to be the best. Running from one extreme or another inevitably leads to short-term gain but long-term ruin. Let’s look at the facts versus the fads

1. SAID means Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demand. This means “you get what you train for and nothing else.” For example, if all you do is lift weights and do not train for any form of endurance, you will be able to work up to two minutes and then fatigue out. The same is true for endurance-only training in a steady state; you are not powerful at any level.

DSC_1149

2. Flexibility, but more precisely being able to move within a greater range of motion, is wonderful. But if you have no strength in that range of motion, all you have done is stretch ligaments and joint capsules and have not created a strong and stable joint to increase range of motion.

3. Neurological adaptation is a principle that says the more you perform a movement, the more efficient you become at that movement. The more efficient you become, the less calories you burn at that activity.

4. The larger your muscle, the more calories you burn, the better you look and the better bone density you have. So where does this leave us? Here are some principled suggestions to change your training regime:

Balance what you do. Do less intense cardio one to two days a week for 45 minutes or longer. Do cardiovascular intervals, going to a higher heart rate, up to two days a week. Lift weights to failure two to three days a week. Work on some type of range of motion training one to two days a week.

Key to Balance 2

Train using periodization. Have a goal for a 12-week training cycle. Within that cycle, make two week micro cycles where you vary your workouts with a specific purpose. The first two weeks can be focused on stability (Yoga, lighter weights and stability ball work, Pilates.) The second two weeks can be focused on strength building by doing sets to failure. The third two weeks can be power movements (Olympic lifting, HIIT and Spinning.) Then you repeat the three phases.

REST! Every athlete needs an off-season. Rest and recovery is sometimes the thing you need after training hard for an event or an 8-12 week workout cycle. Recover by also doing massage, trigger point or Rolfing. Resting between intense bouts of exercise is needed, so make sure you have a rest day somewhere in your week.

Key to Balance 3Balance in exercise, diet and lifestyle is key to longevity and happiness. Any of our personal trainers would be happy to meet with you and talk about what kind of balance works best for you. Please contact Vic Spatola, Director of Personal Training, or look through our Personal Training page for more information.

 

Pregnancy Workouts: 4 Reasons to Work Out Before, During and After

**Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise program. This general information is not intended to replace your healthcare professional. Consult with your healthcare professional to design an appropriate exercise prescription.*

Exercise has many benefits for women before and after pregnancy. Although the gym might feel like the last thing on your mind, it is important to keep active during all three trimesters of your pregnancy. Greenwood Athletic Club trainer Kelly Buresh has a passion for helping people find their happiest and healthiest self through exercise. “I was always taught that if I put my heart into something, not only could I achieve my goal but I would get immense satisfaction from it.” She believes that taking care of yourself physically improves your life in every facet. She shared with us four important reasons to keep moving before, during, and after your pregnancy.

Leading up to Pregnancy: If you are looking to get pregnant, maintaining a healthy regiment as far as physical exercise, diet and nutrition is key in prepping your body to even attain pregnancy! It can be a challenge to become pregnant if you are overweight or if you are not regularly meeting your nutritional needs.  Furthermore, maintaining healthy levels of blood pressure, and maintaining a healthy diet makes it less likely to experience complications at any stage during pregnancy. While the gym is a great place to get your workout, the best place to start is with something you already enjoy doing, whether it be going on walks, running, taking a group fitness class, playing tennis, or any other form of physical activity. Getting out and moving is important.

Getting Started: During pregnancy, it is important to stay active because the exercise and nutrition decisions you make while pregnant can affect not only you and your baby during pregnancy, but it can affect your child long after their birth. Not only does regular exercise help to relieve unnecessary symptoms such as excessive weight gain, uncomfortable swelling, premature labor, low back pain, sciatica and other pregnancy discomforts. It also greatly reduces the likelihood of experiencing complications such as high blood pressure, hypertension or gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise can help your child avoid things like diabetes and excessive weight in their early childhood as well. Even if you don’t already exercise on a regular basis (and unless your doctor tells you otherwise), it is recommended that you can begin an exercise regimen while pregnant. The types of exercise you might do varies from each person, but going on short 10-15 minute walks are a great way to get in some movement. Also, body weight exercises such as squats will be helpful in building leg strength, your abdominals, and even your upper body if you want to add in some weights. These exercises help to maximize your time and energy.IMG_2175IMG_2179

Benefits of Exercise: Maintaining muscle tone and building your endurance are both factors in helping women deliver babies. By building up your muscles and maintaining active, it can help alleviate the physically exhaustive process of delivering a baby. A helpful exercise for maintaining muscle tone is to do lunges with weight on one side. This requires your upper body where you have to brace your abdominals during labor to be strengthened. Another exercise, the farmers carry, even with just one weight forces you to use your abdominals to keep upright, again strengthening an area that’s key to labor.IMG_2170IMG_2173

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting Back After Pregnancy: During pregnancy, you might feel a bit of derailment not just with weight, but it might be that your muscle structures have changed as well. Returning to your pre-pregnancy body doesn’t happen quickly and its different for everyone, since each woman has a different labor and birth experience. The important thing is to have a plan and be sure to consult with a personal trainer who can help you get ideas for how to recover. The best thing you can do after labor is to make time for yourself.
It is important to mentally have some time each day for yourself, not to mention the many mental benefits you get from adding in physical exercise. After consulting with your doctor and a personal trainer, you might consider starting 2 to 3 days a week and then assessing how much you can physically handle. Not to mention, our GATC Kids Club is available for you to drop off infants ages 6 weeks to 6 months for 1 ½ hours per visit. Our infant area is completely enclosed offering your baby a quiet and peaceful environment.

Please be sure to reach out to our Kelly Buresh and our Personal Trainers if you are interested in learning more about personal training sessions, and making time to have Greenwood Athletic Club be the best part of your day!

KellyBureshweb

Grab the Dumbbells: Using Free Weights at the Gym

By Vic Spatola, Director of Personal Training

This article originally appeared in the April 2017 edition of The Pulse

What is the difference between working out on a singular weight lifting machine and lifting with free weights? Aren’t both weight training activities? Shouldn’t they give you the same benefits? In a word-NO!

Lifting in a fixed machine has some benefits:

  • It gives you the ability to isolate a muscle for maximal growth or hypertrophy
  • If you have an injury, the machine can limit the range of motion to allow you to work in a safe method

Traditionally, fixed isolated machines have been the default equipment for most weight rooms. Their simple and easy use has made gym participants more likely to lift weights. They were originally created for body builders in the 1970’s to allow them to isolate specific muscles for competition. Most were designed by former lifters who knew how an exercise should feel and then put resistance against that motion. Arthur Jones revolutionized this type of training by introducing the first line of Nautilus equipment. This equipment was the first to use a cam method, allowing the strength curve to increase as the muscle got stronger and it brought many gym goers into the weight room.

But let’s fast forward to modern times. We now understand that training exclusively in a machine limits core activation, range of motion and hampers your functional ability. Even though machines can isolate a particular muscle, they lack an overall whole body benefit.

When you lift free weights, you benefit in these ways:

  • More intense core activation
  • Stabilizer muscle activation to decrease unwanted motion
  • More muscles working and more calories burned during workouts
  • More balance and vestibular system challenge
  • Better preparation for sports and daily life

stepupDSC_7282

Lifting with free weights allows you to train in a three-dimensional world where as a machine locks you into one plane of movement. Every day we are affected by many external forces (i.e. gravity, rotational forces and linear resistance) and these forces are taken away when training on a machine. Not only does free weight training allow for a more complete workout, it allows for compound movements to occur with resistance. For example, if I do a bicep curl and then I add a step up on a bench as I do it, I can burn more calories and have more muscles working then simply doing either exercise. Also, when doing a barbell exercise like a deadlift or a squat, you use more core activation and increase flexibility and overall range of motion.

As the demands of a busy life increase, we need to be more efficient and selective about how we work out. Doing the same old line of machines that we have been doing for the last five years is less beneficial than moving in a three-dimensional pattern with resistance. Ask one of our personal training experts to set you up on a new weight training program!

Greenwood offers One-on-One Training, which allows you and your trainer to individualize your workout and spend a great deal of time focusing on form, technique and the best way for you to see results, or Semi-Private Personal Training, where you and a friend (or group of up to four friends) will get a great workout together with one of our professional trainers. This is a perfect option for those who like to workout with a friend but need guidance and instruction to maintain consistency and remain efficient.

We also offer a number of PWRFIT classes throughout the week, which deliver functional training movements in a circuit style format to create a high energy, calorie burning, muscle-building workout with professionally mixed music. We offer three class options: Upper Body/Core, Lower Body/Core and Total Body.

_MG_8770_72dpi_9X13

Can Strength Training Improve your Cycling?

As the weather warms up, it’s the perfect time to start thinking about all the bike rides that you will be taking this summer. With a variety of different bike paths and mountainous settings, bike riding in Colorado is both challenging and rewarding. Like any other athletic activity, it’s not something that you just want to j18197621_10155253757309911_1756136640_n (1)ump back into. Bike riders from all backgrounds, spanning from recreational to professional, will benefit from one-on-one coaching to help create a regiment that strengthens your body, keeps you safe from injury, and improves your overall experience on your bicycle.  I followed Greenwood Athletic Club personal trainer Jennifer Schumm around the gym where she highlighted four areas to focus on that will pay off when you get on your bicycle.

  1. Working Your Core: Although you may be inclined to think that your leg strength is the first area to focus on, Jennifer recommends starting with your core area. There’s a lot of power in our core, but our brains often don’t use them. Often times we tend to be weak in two areas, specifically the psoas and iliopsoas. These areas come into play when you are working on keeping stable and upright on your bicycle, or when you lift your knees up in the pedal stroke. By strengthening these two core areas, your body uses those muscles for power, speed and endurance on the bike. This gives your body an opportunity to engage an area besides your legs, which can build up lactic acid as you ride. By engaging the power from your other muscles, especially your core area, you will end up having a more powerful, sustained ride. A great way to build up your core area is to integrate in TRX exercises, including mountain climbers, pikes, center tucks with side to side tucks, which Jennifer highlights below:

 

  1. Engaging Your Glutes: There’s a lot of power in our glutes, but we often overlook how important they can be. Strengthening your glutes can also help alleviate imbalances in the pelvis, knees and spine. Think of these muscles as your secret biking weapon. A great way to build up this area is by doing glute hip thrusts, both single and dual leg glute extensions, as Jennifer shows us below. This exercise is beneficial in helping you develop strength and power in your gluteus maximus muscle.

  1. Strengthen your back: If you think about when you are on the bike hunched over, your shoulders are in and your chest becomes concaved. This is why it’s very important to strengthen your back so that you can open up your shoulders and chest. That’s not just going to help you on the bike, but includes long term benefits to improving your everyday posture. Two great places to target in your back are your lats and rhomboids. Having a strong back leads to better posture when you are on your bike. This allows you to pull with your upper body when you are out of the saddle climbing, sprinting, and helps you maintain your bike position for long periods of time. Jennifer demonstrates two important exercises that can help you strengthen this area, specifically body weight pull ups and the seated row.

 

  1. Improve your Upper Body Strength:Off season training is a great opportunity to build up your back consisting of rear delts, lats, rhomboids, and erector spinae.  However you need to think of the upper body as a whole and balanced which is why it is important to also train the opposition of the upper body as well, triceps, chest shoulder and biceps. Incorporating in upper body strength training will help you become less fatigued on your bike ride. You want to be sure to have the upper body strength and endurance to not only maintain your posture on your bike for long rides so that your body and legs become less fatigued, and therefore maintain power speed and position, but also be able to use the upper body when climbing, attacking, sprinting, etc.   You can increase your strength through push-ups, pull-ups, and tricep dips, all of these always bodyweight, and rear delt raises.

 

As Jennifer Schumm has learned from her years as a cyclist and personal trainer, and cycling and Spinning instructor dedicating some time to working on muscle strength before you get out onto your bike will have some long-lasting results. Jennifer specializes her personal training sessions to her client’s needs, so that you can get the very most out of your training sessions. Don’t wait until the summer to get started, feel free to email Jennifer at jennifers@GreenwoodATC.com to set up a consultation today and get started.

Jennifer Schumm
NASM Certified Personal Trainer
USA Cycling, CAT 1 (Semi-Pro) Road Cyclist

The Gamification of Exercise

An example of the current gamification trend is Performance IQ in our cycling classes. By displaying your work on a screen, the instructor can create challenges in class to get more out of each participant, you can view your current level of work in real time and the data is a great motivator! The popular device fitbit™ records movement and counts steps to motivate the individual to move more and sit less.

GATC is introducing another gamification device to our members in MYZONE! This activity tracker/ heart rate monitor records all your workouts and assigns points for your effort and workout. Based on your average heart rate, the device calculates yimages---photos_iphone-mockup-2_800x534our effort level and minutes of activity to assign you MEPs (MYZONE Effort Points.) Those MEPs are then used in challenges to track who is leading, individually or on a team.

Gamification of exercise is more than a screen displaying your output; it is a way to connect with other participants to have fun while staying active. By creating challenges on an app or in social media, people can see where they rank in a challenge and how their effort has elevated their team. These results can be shared on social media and can be viewed by your fellow team mates, holding you accountable for working out and staying consistent. By participating in contests based on your activity and effort, your workouts are more consistent and fun! We are using MYZONE this year for our 2017 Fitness Challenge to help you be accountable and help you achieve your goals.

Accountability and consistency are important keys to attaining the results you’re looking for, but adding FUN to your workouts is important too!

Vic Spatola, Director of Personal Training

Fit Family: the Serenyis

cuteDSC_4696Steve and Christy Serenyis joined GATC ten years ago, just a few months after they were married. Christy: When we moved south of Denver I wanted a good club with some intense classes. I picked GATC primarily because of the class options. We didn’t have children when we first joined, but I had heard the GATC kids programs were really good. I did the Outdoor Fit classes and loved them. A group of five or six of us really bonded last year. We wanted to keep working out really hard so we joined Boxing Babes. Now our group has grown and we participate in PWRFIT with Brandon. I like a teacher that pushes me. PWRFIT has great music and Brandon works us really hard. For Barre, it is the same thing. Christine or Chrissy are both great teachers with some really good high energy flow music.

Steve comes three times a week, Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, and focuses on the weight room and maybe some stair-master work. Christy: The staff in the Kids’ Club is special. They are so understanding and forgiving to the moms when we are tired and dropping off our kids quickly. Not that they know us, it is as simple as opening the door, the kids run in and you run away. I have witnessed crying kids and crying moms with the staff saying “We got this, just go” and I have assured other mothers “they will find you if there is a problem.”

Christy and Steve also speak highly of Little Lobbers instructor, Lisa Thomas. They feel that Lisa is good at engaging even challenging kids. She loves them even when they have bad days as kids do. If Christy wasn’t there at the end of Little Lobbers, Lisa knew she was in a class and took her child back to the Kids Club.

Nine-year old Anna just joined the Greenwood Tiger Shark swim team, but also plays tennis and soccer. Anna likes school (third grade) and is great at everything. MarcuteDSC_4737shall is seven and in second grade. He is an excellent reader, well above his age group. He participated in Little Lobbers with Lisa and has taken Stroke School. Harrison is five and has done a lot here at the club. He is in his third year of Little Lobbers with Lisa. He loves everything and Trish has helped him be really good at swimming.

MacKenzie is the youngest at two and a half. She loves Kids’ Club and taking swim lessons with Trish too. Christy: I often think of my mother’s regret. She wishes now that she had taken time for her own needs while raising children. I tell my friends, take just one hour; your kids will be fine. My husband sees that because I work out, I am a lot happier. I know Steve is happier because he works out and we want our children to find happiness and be healthy too. I like the community here. Since GATC is smaller, a lot of us recognize each other. I think the community creates more respect for each other – it is cleaner, neater and friendlier. I tell people to come here all the time!

Nothing Can Stop You

Let’s face it, joining a health club can be intimidating. It doesn’t matter who you are or what you’ve done athletically in the past. Entering a new environment with new people, processes, studios and classes can be exciting and overwhelming. Be encouraged—you are not alone and we are here to help! Every month new members join our club with the same hopes, goals and expectations you have. Whether you want to run your first 5K, complete all the obstacles in a Tough Mudder, set a personal best in an upcoming triathlon, become leaner, healthier or stronger, or lose that first 20 or last 10 pounds; if you have a goal, Greenwood can help you get there. It really is as simple as getting started. What begins as stepping outside your comfort zone will soon feel like home.

Start by planning your first visit and then your next. Put specific classes on your calendar. Schedule your introductory personal training or Pilates session. Create the habit of consistently walking through our doors at least four times each week and soon Greenwood will become “The Best Part of Your Day!” If you have great intentions, or had them at one point but need accountability, simply invite a friend, colleague or neighbor tstrong_LRo visit the club and join themselves. Then, the two of you can hold each other accountable,
workout together and be the voice of encouragement on sticking to your plan. Studies prove that working out with a friend or trainer you are accountable to, will increase your likelihood of staying consistent, enjoying the process and ultimately reaching your goals.

Whether you’ve been a member for years or are new to Greenwood, don’t let the intimidation factor or anything else stop you. The more you exercise, the better you’ll feel and the quicker you will achieve the results you came here for. Only attending twice per week? Try a new class or add a strength day to your routine. Need a little extra guidance? Set up a time to meet with me. I can help set up a personalized workout plan with class recommendations, workout ideas and exercises you can do to get the results you are looking for. My services as Member Coach are complimentary and open to all Greenwood members. Schedule your next workout today! Get started and let me know if I can help.

Sheri Warren
Member Coach
Greenwood Athletic and Tennis Club