Pregnancy Workouts: 4 Reasons to Work Out Before, During and After

**Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise program. This general information is not intended to replace your healthcare professional. Consult with your healthcare professional to design an appropriate exercise prescription.*

Exercise has many benefits for women before and after pregnancy. Although the gym might feel like the last thing on your mind, it is important to keep active during all three trimesters of your pregnancy. Greenwood Athletic Club trainer Kelly Buresh has a passion for helping people find their happiest and healthiest self through exercise. “I was always taught that if I put my heart into something, not only could I achieve my goal but I would get immense satisfaction from it.” She believes that taking care of yourself physically improves your life in every facet. She shared with us four important reasons to keep moving before, during, and after your pregnancy.

Leading up to Pregnancy: If you are looking to get pregnant, maintaining a healthy regiment as far as physical exercise, diet and nutrition is key in prepping your body to even attain pregnancy! It can be a challenge to become pregnant if you are overweight or if you are not regularly meeting your nutritional needs.  Furthermore, maintaining healthy levels of blood pressure, and maintaining a healthy diet makes it less likely to experience complications at any stage during pregnancy. While the gym is a great place to get your workout, the best place to start is with something you already enjoy doing, whether it be going on walks, running, taking a group fitness class, playing tennis, or any other form of physical activity. Getting out and moving is important.

Getting Started: During pregnancy, it is important to stay active because the exercise and nutrition decisions you make while pregnant can affect not only you and your baby during pregnancy, but it can affect your child long after their birth. Not only does regular exercise help to relieve unnecessary symptoms such as excessive weight gain, uncomfortable swelling, premature labor, low back pain, sciatica and other pregnancy discomforts. It also greatly reduces the likelihood of experiencing complications such as high blood pressure, hypertension or gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise can help your child avoid things like diabetes and excessive weight in their early childhood as well. Even if you don’t already exercise on a regular basis (and unless your doctor tells you otherwise), it is recommended that you can begin an exercise regimen while pregnant. The types of exercise you might do varies from each person, but going on short 10-15 minute walks are a great way to get in some movement. Also, body weight exercises such as squats will be helpful in building leg strength, your abdominals, and even your upper body if you want to add in some weights. These exercises help to maximize your time and energy.IMG_2175IMG_2179

Benefits of Exercise: Maintaining muscle tone and building your endurance are both factors in helping women deliver babies. By building up your muscles and maintaining active, it can help alleviate the physically exhaustive process of delivering a baby. A helpful exercise for maintaining muscle tone is to do lunges with weight on one side. This requires your upper body where you have to brace your abdominals during labor to be strengthened. Another exercise, the farmers carry, even with just one weight forces you to use your abdominals to keep upright, again strengthening an area that’s key to labor.IMG_2170IMG_2173

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting Back After Pregnancy: During pregnancy, you might feel a bit of derailment not just with weight, but it might be that your muscle structures have changed as well. Returning to your pre-pregnancy body doesn’t happen quickly and its different for everyone, since each woman has a different labor and birth experience. The important thing is to have a plan and be sure to consult with a personal trainer who can help you get ideas for how to recover. The best thing you can do after labor is to make time for yourself.
It is important to mentally have some time each day for yourself, not to mention the many mental benefits you get from adding in physical exercise. After consulting with your doctor and a personal trainer, you might consider starting 2 to 3 days a week and then assessing how much you can physically handle. Not to mention, our GATC Kids Club is available for you to drop off infants ages 6 weeks to 6 months for 1 ½ hours per visit. Our infant area is completely enclosed offering your baby a quiet and peaceful environment.

Please be sure to reach out to our Kelly Buresh and our Personal Trainers if you are interested in learning more about personal training sessions, and making time to have Greenwood Athletic Club be the best part of your day!

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Big Changes Start with Small Decisions

Big Changes Start with Small Decisions

As another beautiful spring season approaches, I am excited for all of the upcoming changes we are about to enjoy….longer days, bluer skies, greener grass, blooming flowers, chirping birds and warmer weather. Big changes like these start small and improve with every sunrise. The same can be true of you! Big changes in our health, strength and wellness begin with small decisions every morning to choose health. That is all it takes. A commitment to make small changes every day. Every small decision impacts the end result, so whether you are just starting out or have hit a plateau, make the decision to add something positive or remove something negative that could be sabotaging your efforts. Make this the best spring season of your life!

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Make the decision today to eat whole foods, show up for that Group Fitness class, use the weight room, stay a bit longer on that cardio equipment or swim a few more laps. Every small decision will add up to improvements in heart health, strength and overall wellness.

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Be careful though, because the same can be true in reverse. Small decisions to ignore your health, drive past Greenwood, skip that class, ignore the weight room, take a few minutes less on that cardio equipment-even choosing to order the fat- laden fries or super, crazy desert-can add up to big results in the wrong direction.

Choose to support your health and you will sleep better, feel better and even look better! Need ideas on how to switch things up or challenge yourself just a bit more this spring? Call me and take advantage of Greenwood’s complimentary Member Coaching services. It’s another small decision that could lead to big results.

SheriWarren_webSheri Warren, Director of Sales and Retention

 

Get Your Veggies

GET YOUR VEGGIES

This article originally appeared in the Spring 2017 issue of The Pulse

By Kristin Burgess, RD

Vegetables are an important part of your diet, providing fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients that protect cells from improper replication. The media leads us to believe that it is hard to eat the large amount of recommended servings but here are a few tips:

  1. Eat vegetables with at least two meals a day. Don’t worry about portion size- just eat them! Aim to fill half your plate with vegetables.vegetable salad on plate with blank spcae for wording
  2. Eat three vegetables a day in addition to your two meals.
  3. Eat a large salad with lots of healthy greens every day. You can always pick one up at Ink! Coffee here at the club.
  4. Many vegetables need to be cut, sliced, dipped or cooked but think about the convenient vegetables that don’t! Carrots, cucumbers and bell peppers do not need any preparation as they are easy and convenient to eat raw. Try something new – eat a bell pepper just like you would an apple! Throw them into your bag and eat one anywhere, anytime
  5. Always have a vegetable on hand. Bring one with you so it is always available.

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If you are low on vegetables in your diet, put them at the top of your grocery list. Do a little washing, slicing and dicing in the morning when packing lunch. Plan ahead, eat your veggies and be healthy!

Grab the Dumbbells: Using Free Weights at the Gym

By Vic Spatola, Director of Personal Training

This article originally appeared in the April 2017 edition of The Pulse

What is the difference between working out on a singular weight lifting machine and lifting with free weights? Aren’t both weight training activities? Shouldn’t they give you the same benefits? In a word-NO!

Lifting in a fixed machine has some benefits:

  • It gives you the ability to isolate a muscle for maximal growth or hypertrophy
  • If you have an injury, the machine can limit the range of motion to allow you to work in a safe method

Traditionally, fixed isolated machines have been the default equipment for most weight rooms. Their simple and easy use has made gym participants more likely to lift weights. They were originally created for body builders in the 1970’s to allow them to isolate specific muscles for competition. Most were designed by former lifters who knew how an exercise should feel and then put resistance against that motion. Arthur Jones revolutionized this type of training by introducing the first line of Nautilus equipment. This equipment was the first to use a cam method, allowing the strength curve to increase as the muscle got stronger and it brought many gym goers into the weight room.

But let’s fast forward to modern times. We now understand that training exclusively in a machine limits core activation, range of motion and hampers your functional ability. Even though machines can isolate a particular muscle, they lack an overall whole body benefit.

When you lift free weights, you benefit in these ways:

  • More intense core activation
  • Stabilizer muscle activation to decrease unwanted motion
  • More muscles working and more calories burned during workouts
  • More balance and vestibular system challenge
  • Better preparation for sports and daily life

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Lifting with free weights allows you to train in a three-dimensional world where as a machine locks you into one plane of movement. Every day we are affected by many external forces (i.e. gravity, rotational forces and linear resistance) and these forces are taken away when training on a machine. Not only does free weight training allow for a more complete workout, it allows for compound movements to occur with resistance. For example, if I do a bicep curl and then I add a step up on a bench as I do it, I can burn more calories and have more muscles working then simply doing either exercise. Also, when doing a barbell exercise like a deadlift or a squat, you use more core activation and increase flexibility and overall range of motion.

As the demands of a busy life increase, we need to be more efficient and selective about how we work out. Doing the same old line of machines that we have been doing for the last five years is less beneficial than moving in a three-dimensional pattern with resistance. Ask one of our personal training experts to set you up on a new weight training program!

Greenwood offers One-on-One Training, which allows you and your trainer to individualize your workout and spend a great deal of time focusing on form, technique and the best way for you to see results, or Semi-Private Personal Training, where you and a friend (or group of up to four friends) will get a great workout together with one of our professional trainers. This is a perfect option for those who like to workout with a friend but need guidance and instruction to maintain consistency and remain efficient.

We also offer a number of PWRFIT classes throughout the week, which deliver functional training movements in a circuit style format to create a high energy, calorie burning, muscle-building workout with professionally mixed music. We offer three class options: Upper Body/Core, Lower Body/Core and Total Body.

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Smart Start by Les Mills

Smart Start by Les Mills

by Andrea Morris, Director of Group FitnessBodyPump at Greenwood Athletic and Tennis Club

When it comes to motivation, your brain is a mysterious creature. One minute you’re pumped, full of enthusiasm, a few weeks later the excuses start to creep in and before you know it you haven’t been to the gym all week. Smart Start is a beginner’s plan for fitness that is based on scientific research. Follow this simple approach to guarantee that your first steps to fitness are not your last.

Three Secrets to Success

  1. START SLOW– Don’t push your body too soon. It’s okay to stop working out when you’ve had enough.
  2. BUILD GRADUALLY– Aim towards completing full workouts as your fitness builds.
  3. MIX IT UP– Mix strength, cardio and flexibility training options and learn what workouts consistently motivate you to get moving.

Small Changes

When you’re starting out, a good goal to aim for is 150 minutes of exercise a week. Research shows that with 150 minutes of exercise a week you will start enjoying the health benefits of exercise. The next goal is 250–300 minutes. This is the suggested amount of weekly exercise needed to begin seeing some of the physical changes that accompany exercise without making  any changes to your diet. If you’re up for this challenge, you can begin following our scientifically-proven six-week introduction. This workout plan lets you know how to mix up your workouts to maximize effectiveness and keep it interesting.

Another smart move is to set goals. Setting goals can be a huge help at any stage of your exercise journey. We suggest setting two goals; one based on the results you’re after and one on the behavior you’re trying to change. For example, I want to drop one size and I want to get to the gym twice next week. Post these goals where you will see them often, like on the fridge or on your mirror. Make sure your goals are realistic and don’t be too hard on yourself. As you reach each of your goals you can reevaluate how much time you are exercising and what you are trying to achieve.

Get Together

People who work out in a group are far more likely to stick to exercise than those who go it alone. Get Fit Together, a study conducted by Dr. Jinger Gottschall from the Pennsylvania State University, followed 25 sedentary adults through a 30-week program of group fitness classes. The 30 weeks started with an initial six-week period encouraging the exercisers to “dip their toes” into fitness before building up to a six-day-a-week exercise schedule. The gradual introduction meant that instead of feeling sore from overworking unfit muscles and giving up, the group actually enjoyed their path into exercise. The results were so good that participants delayed the onset of cardiovascular disease by an average of 3.6 years. Over the 30-week study, 20 out of 25 study participants never missed a workout – a compliance rate of 98.8 per cent – almost unheard of in exercise studies. This commitment is proof that, when it comes to exercise, you shouldn’t go it alone. Combining a steady start with the support of others works wonders.

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After Six-Weeks

To really lock in your healthy new habit, the next 12 weeks are just as critical to your success. Each week from now should include three 60 minute cardio workouts, two 60 minute strength workouts and one 60 minute session of core/flexibility work. If you want to find out about cardio, strength, core and flexibility workout options, please consult our Group Fitness Schedule.

Andrea Morris, Director of Group Fitness | 303.770.2582 x312 | AndreaM@GreenwoodATC.com

Can Strength Training Improve your Cycling?

As the weather warms up, it’s the perfect time to start thinking about all the bike rides that you will be taking this summer. With a variety of different bike paths and mountainous settings, bike riding in Colorado is both challenging and rewarding. Like any other athletic activity, it’s not something that you just want to j18197621_10155253757309911_1756136640_n (1)ump back into. Bike riders from all backgrounds, spanning from recreational to professional, will benefit from one-on-one coaching to help create a regiment that strengthens your body, keeps you safe from injury, and improves your overall experience on your bicycle.  I followed Greenwood Athletic Club personal trainer Jennifer Schumm around the gym where she highlighted four areas to focus on that will pay off when you get on your bicycle.

  1. Working Your Core: Although you may be inclined to think that your leg strength is the first area to focus on, Jennifer recommends starting with your core area. There’s a lot of power in our core, but our brains often don’t use them. Often times we tend to be weak in two areas, specifically the psoas and iliopsoas. These areas come into play when you are working on keeping stable and upright on your bicycle, or when you lift your knees up in the pedal stroke. By strengthening these two core areas, your body uses those muscles for power, speed and endurance on the bike. This gives your body an opportunity to engage an area besides your legs, which can build up lactic acid as you ride. By engaging the power from your other muscles, especially your core area, you will end up having a more powerful, sustained ride. A great way to build up your core area is to integrate in TRX exercises, including mountain climbers, pikes, center tucks with side to side tucks, which Jennifer highlights below:

 

  1. Engaging Your Glutes: There’s a lot of power in our glutes, but we often overlook how important they can be. Strengthening your glutes can also help alleviate imbalances in the pelvis, knees and spine. Think of these muscles as your secret biking weapon. A great way to build up this area is by doing glute hip thrusts, both single and dual leg glute extensions, as Jennifer shows us below. This exercise is beneficial in helping you develop strength and power in your gluteus maximus muscle.

  1. Strengthen your back: If you think about when you are on the bike hunched over, your shoulders are in and your chest becomes concaved. This is why it’s very important to strengthen your back so that you can open up your shoulders and chest. That’s not just going to help you on the bike, but includes long term benefits to improving your everyday posture. Two great places to target in your back are your lats and rhomboids. Having a strong back leads to better posture when you are on your bike. This allows you to pull with your upper body when you are out of the saddle climbing, sprinting, and helps you maintain your bike position for long periods of time. Jennifer demonstrates two important exercises that can help you strengthen this area, specifically body weight pull ups and the seated row.

 

  1. Improve your Upper Body Strength:Off season training is a great opportunity to build up your back consisting of rear delts, lats, rhomboids, and erector spinae.  However you need to think of the upper body as a whole and balanced which is why it is important to also train the opposition of the upper body as well, triceps, chest shoulder and biceps. Incorporating in upper body strength training will help you become less fatigued on your bike ride. You want to be sure to have the upper body strength and endurance to not only maintain your posture on your bike for long rides so that your body and legs become less fatigued, and therefore maintain power speed and position, but also be able to use the upper body when climbing, attacking, sprinting, etc.   You can increase your strength through push-ups, pull-ups, and tricep dips, all of these always bodyweight, and rear delt raises.

 

As Jennifer Schumm has learned from her years as a cyclist and personal trainer, and cycling and Spinning instructor dedicating some time to working on muscle strength before you get out onto your bike will have some long-lasting results. Jennifer specializes her personal training sessions to her client’s needs, so that you can get the very most out of your training sessions. Don’t wait until the summer to get started, feel free to email Jennifer at jennifers@GreenwoodATC.com to set up a consultation today and get started.

Jennifer Schumm
NASM Certified Personal Trainer
USA Cycling, CAT 1 (Semi-Pro) Road Cyclist

How to Improve Your Tennis Game with Pilates

As those summer months get closer, now is the perfect opportunity to head into our Pilates studio and improve your tennis game by working on strengthening your body, improving your balance, enhancing your flexibility and building your core strength. Whether you have tried Pilates before, or are interested in it for the first time, our upcoming Pilates for Tennis six-week workshop is the perfect opportunity for you to boost your tennis techniques off the court. Pilates programs are always ongoing and available for you to take and improve your tennis game.

Under the guidance of our talented instructor Erica Bruenton, you will use the six principles of Pilates as a foundation for drawing connections between the fundamentals of both Pilates and tennis.

  1. Concentration: Pilates is contingent on developing the connection between the mind and the body. Just like in tennis, you are never focusing on one thing at a time. It is particularly important to learn how to focus on your body’s powerhouse, the transverse/oblique/rectus abdominis, as well as the inner thighs and glutes. A big piece of bringing that together is the ability to concentrate and think about how the different muscles of your body are working together. You are engaging in similar activities on the tennis court, such as concentrating on multiple areas including stroke mechanics, swing speed, follow through, and recovering back to a ready position after you return the ball.
  2. Centering: In Pilates we initiate movement from our powerhouse–all movement comes from the center. The core is equally important in tennis. If you visualize yourself on the court, there is a lot of rotational movement. Pilates encourages you to think about the kinetic chain of movement, where you are transferring energy from the ground, through your legs, core, and then into your shoulder, arm, wrist, which ultimately results in racquet head speed. Finding your center, as well as learning how to move it efficiently, will help increase your technique for generating power on the tennis court.
  3. Control: Pilates helps strengthen your understanding of how to coordinate the movement of your body. For example, various Pilates exercises work on moving your legs and arms while keeping your abs engaged and pelvis stable. Control is equally important in tennis. On the tennis court, you utilize the split step to feel in control of your body as you get ready to take your next shot.
  4. Breathing: Do you ever find yourself holding your breath when you play tennis, as you hit the ball or react to get in position for a shot? This is a common issue among many tennis players, and an area in which taking Pilates can be extremely beneficial. Pilates teaches you to link your breath with movement. As a tennis player, this teaches you to incorporate breathing techniques to enhance fluidity in your movement on the court.
  5. Precision: As a tennis player, when you hit the ball you visualize where you want your shot to go. Similarly, in Pilates we build on concentration and control to achieve precision in movement. Pilates teaches you to engage your abdominals to stabilize your pelvis. Achieving stability and mobility that allows your joints to move through a healthy range of motion is very important, not just on the tennis court, but in your everyday activities.
  6. Flowing Movement: Perhaps one of the most important aspects of tennis is being able to put all of your techniques together. In a tennis lesson or in drill, this might mean transitioning from baseline groundstroke, to a down the line approach shot, to a cross court volley to finish the point. When it comes to a match, you have to be able to put everything together to get the win. The concept of flowing movement within Pilates is the ability to move through a repertoire of exercises with fluidity. In Pilates, this is achieved through transition exercises, like teaser and the roll up, where you build strength while continuing to flow between different exercises.

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(These images feature a progression series, where Tennis Professional Suzette Riddle is using the reformer’s straps to work through a progression of exercises that work on concentration, centering and control).

In the Pilates for Tennis class,  the majority of your exercises on the reformer, which is the spring-loaded apparatus. The color coordinated springs represent the different amounts of tension that are used during the workout.

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On the apparatus itself, you will be moving through a variety of positions. The videos below, featuring Tennis Professional Suzette Riddle, show different exercises that can be performed on the reformer that will help you build strength and coordination both on and off the court.

Sign up for Pilates for Tennis to secure your spot. There is no equipment necessary, just come willing to work with Erica! We are excited to offer two classes, one on Tuesdays @ 12:00-12:55pm from April 4 to May 9, and then other on Saturdays from 8:00-8:55am from April 8 to May 20 (with the exception of the Saturday before Easter, there will be no class on April 15).

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If you can’t make it to this course, Erica Bruenton is always more than willing to work one-on-one with clients, feel free to contact her to schedule a session!

Best Kept Weight Loss Secrets

1. No carb isn’t the answer
Lowering your carbs is likely beneficial but avoiding carbohydrates all together is unhealthy and unrealistic. Aim to have 30-40% of your calories come from carbohydrates. Make your grains whole and/or sprouted. If you are in a situation that you are unsure if an item is whole, don’t eat it.
2. Protein is not a magical nutrient
No more than 30% of your calories should come from protein. If more than this amount is consumed on a long term basis, your liver will be stressed and you will likely see this in a blood test. In addition, more than this is not beneficial for weight loss, fat loss, muscle gain or energy improvement.water_drinking
3. Chug 20 ounces of water upon waking
Get out of bed. Go to the restroom. Chug your water. Continue with your
morning routine. You will be amazed at the energy, appetite control and reduced brain fog you will have throughout your day.
4. Drink half your body weight in ounces of water, minimum
Get a reusable 32 ounce bottle and calculate how many total bottles you need in a day. Set a daily time line in which it needs to be consumed. For example: two in the morning before lunch (including the water you drink upon waking) and one after lunch before
dinner. Workout water doesn’t count.
5. Never twice in one day or two days in a row
This is Kristin’s Rule of Two that will help you live a lifestyle of guilt-free balance. Use this rule to apply to any part of your healthy lifestyle: portions, unhealthy choices, alcohol, not meeting water goals or not exercising. If you choose something unhealthy at lunch, no treat later in the day. Stay on track the rest of your day and the following day. If you drink alcohol one night, the next day needs to be right on track with water, food and exercise.
6. Think Before You Eat
Take thirty seconds to think about the food before you eat it. Do this with all foods: apples, cucumbers, cookies, alcohol, pasta, etc. Ask yourself 1) how will I feel after I eat this? 2) will this help me reach my goal? This will allow you to attach positive emotions to healthy foods and negative emotions to unhealthy foods, allowing for better control of mind over matter.
7. Eat a minimum of three different veggies per day
We think vegetables are challenging because they are inconvenient. Most veggies need to be chopped, sliced, cooked or dunked in order to taste good. Wrong! Think of the veggies that truly need nothing. Bell peppers, cucumbers, carrots…these need zero preparation. No excuses!
8. Eat every three hours
This is true for most (but not all) people. After four hours, most of us get a dip in blood sugar, then we start to feel the slight signs of low blood sugar and we end up overeating at some point. On the other hand, eating every two hours is likely too close. We never allow our body to be in a “fed” state. This is important for basic metabolism and basic human instinct. It is a good thing to feel a slight bit of hunger, but not a slight bit of low blood sugar. Every time you eat, choose a produce and a protein or healthy fat or fiber.
9. Fruit is not preventing you from losing weight
Choose two per day. I frequently hear that people avoid fruit because of the sugar content. Fruit isn’t the problem and consuming the right amount isn’t preventing you from hitting your health goals.
10. Consistent, daily exercise is a must
There is a big difference between an active lifestyle and exercise and we need both. An active lifestyle is taking the stairs, walking the dog, taking a leisurely bike ride on the Highline Canal or even a nice family hike. Exercise is an organized workout in which your heart rate is elevated for a period of time and is moderate to challenging in intensity for
the time frame you have chosen. These are a few of my biggest secrets! If you need individual help or have questions, please let me know!

Kristin Burgess, Registered Dietitian

The Gamification of Exercise

An example of the current gamification trend is Performance IQ in our cycling classes. By displaying your work on a screen, the instructor can create challenges in class to get more out of each participant, you can view your current level of work in real time and the data is a great motivator! The popular device fitbit™ records movement and counts steps to motivate the individual to move more and sit less.

GATC is introducing another gamification device to our members in MYZONE! This activity tracker/ heart rate monitor records all your workouts and assigns points for your effort and workout. Based on your average heart rate, the device calculates yimages---photos_iphone-mockup-2_800x534our effort level and minutes of activity to assign you MEPs (MYZONE Effort Points.) Those MEPs are then used in challenges to track who is leading, individually or on a team.

Gamification of exercise is more than a screen displaying your output; it is a way to connect with other participants to have fun while staying active. By creating challenges on an app or in social media, people can see where they rank in a challenge and how their effort has elevated their team. These results can be shared on social media and can be viewed by your fellow team mates, holding you accountable for working out and staying consistent. By participating in contests based on your activity and effort, your workouts are more consistent and fun! We are using MYZONE this year for our 2017 Fitness Challenge to help you be accountable and help you achieve your goals.

Accountability and consistency are important keys to attaining the results you’re looking for, but adding FUN to your workouts is important too!

Vic Spatola, Director of Personal Training

Fit Family: the Serenyis

cuteDSC_4696Steve and Christy Serenyis joined GATC ten years ago, just a few months after they were married. Christy: When we moved south of Denver I wanted a good club with some intense classes. I picked GATC primarily because of the class options. We didn’t have children when we first joined, but I had heard the GATC kids programs were really good. I did the Outdoor Fit classes and loved them. A group of five or six of us really bonded last year. We wanted to keep working out really hard so we joined Boxing Babes. Now our group has grown and we participate in PWRFIT with Brandon. I like a teacher that pushes me. PWRFIT has great music and Brandon works us really hard. For Barre, it is the same thing. Christine or Chrissy are both great teachers with some really good high energy flow music.

Steve comes three times a week, Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, and focuses on the weight room and maybe some stair-master work. Christy: The staff in the Kids’ Club is special. They are so understanding and forgiving to the moms when we are tired and dropping off our kids quickly. Not that they know us, it is as simple as opening the door, the kids run in and you run away. I have witnessed crying kids and crying moms with the staff saying “We got this, just go” and I have assured other mothers “they will find you if there is a problem.”

Christy and Steve also speak highly of Little Lobbers instructor, Lisa Thomas. They feel that Lisa is good at engaging even challenging kids. She loves them even when they have bad days as kids do. If Christy wasn’t there at the end of Little Lobbers, Lisa knew she was in a class and took her child back to the Kids Club.

Nine-year old Anna just joined the Greenwood Tiger Shark swim team, but also plays tennis and soccer. Anna likes school (third grade) and is great at everything. MarcuteDSC_4737shall is seven and in second grade. He is an excellent reader, well above his age group. He participated in Little Lobbers with Lisa and has taken Stroke School. Harrison is five and has done a lot here at the club. He is in his third year of Little Lobbers with Lisa. He loves everything and Trish has helped him be really good at swimming.

MacKenzie is the youngest at two and a half. She loves Kids’ Club and taking swim lessons with Trish too. Christy: I often think of my mother’s regret. She wishes now that she had taken time for her own needs while raising children. I tell my friends, take just one hour; your kids will be fine. My husband sees that because I work out, I am a lot happier. I know Steve is happier because he works out and we want our children to find happiness and be healthy too. I like the community here. Since GATC is smaller, a lot of us recognize each other. I think the community creates more respect for each other – it is cleaner, neater and friendlier. I tell people to come here all the time!