The Key to Exercising? It’s Balance!

When the media describes a new fitness trend or training method, they advertise that this is the best new way to train.  Whether it is long duration/low intensity, high intensity interval training or weight training only, each proclaim to be the best. Running from one extreme or another inevitably leads to short-term gain but long-term ruin. Let’s look at the facts versus the fads

1. SAID means Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demand. This means “you get what you train for and nothing else.” For example, if all you do is lift weights and do not train for any form of endurance, you will be able to work up to two minutes and then fatigue out. The same is true for endurance-only training in a steady state; you are not powerful at any level.

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2. Flexibility, but more precisely being able to move within a greater range of motion, is wonderful. But if you have no strength in that range of motion, all you have done is stretch ligaments and joint capsules and have not created a strong and stable joint to increase range of motion.

3. Neurological adaptation is a principle that says the more you perform a movement, the more efficient you become at that movement. The more efficient you become, the less calories you burn at that activity.

4. The larger your muscle, the more calories you burn, the better you look and the better bone density you have. So where does this leave us? Here are some principled suggestions to change your training regime:

Balance what you do. Do less intense cardio one to two days a week for 45 minutes or longer. Do cardiovascular intervals, going to a higher heart rate, up to two days a week. Lift weights to failure two to three days a week. Work on some type of range of motion training one to two days a week.

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Train using periodization. Have a goal for a 12-week training cycle. Within that cycle, make two week micro cycles where you vary your workouts with a specific purpose. The first two weeks can be focused on stability (Yoga, lighter weights and stability ball work, Pilates.) The second two weeks can be focused on strength building by doing sets to failure. The third two weeks can be power movements (Olympic lifting, HIIT and Spinning.) Then you repeat the three phases.

REST! Every athlete needs an off-season. Rest and recovery is sometimes the thing you need after training hard for an event or an 8-12 week workout cycle. Recover by also doing massage, trigger point or Rolfing. Resting between intense bouts of exercise is needed, so make sure you have a rest day somewhere in your week.

Key to Balance 3Balance in exercise, diet and lifestyle is key to longevity and happiness. Any of our personal trainers would be happy to meet with you and talk about what kind of balance works best for you. Please contact Vic Spatola, Director of Personal Training, or look through our Personal Training page for more information.

 

Easy Ways to Improve Your Stability

BosulungeThe basic definition of the word stability is “the state of being stable, firm, solid, steady and secure”. Something that is unstable is considered to be weak, uncertain or wavering. I don’t know about you but I want more of my life to be defined by being solid and steady as opposed to weak and wavering. Your body is a tool that when taken care of and trained properly, can improve your physical stability, allowing you to enjoy the things you value longer and more confidently.

In the fitness world, stability typically means strong and steady. Being stable is critical when creating power and improving athletic performance. With greater stability comes improvements in furthering a Yoga practice, or lifting heavier weights in all three planes of motion. Greater stability allows for simple functional balance to be maintained doing normal daily activities like squatting, standing, lifting and twisting, all movements that are critical to longevity and overall health. Plus, stability improves balance, especially when outside forces seek to overthrow it.

At Greenwood there are lots of activities to incorporate into a weekly routine to improve overall stability. We are here to help you create a strong, solid, secure foundation from which you can enjoy the things you like to do most….hiking, cycling, golfing, gardening, and swimming. Try one of Greenwood’s complimentary classes designed to specifically address these areas. Examples include willPower & Grace, CXWORX, Total Body Fit, Yoga, Mat Pilates and more. Hiring a personal trainer or Pilates instructor to develop a personalized workout plan that addresses the type of stability and mobility you need to reach your personal goals is another fantastic way to make a difference in your overall function and performance.

Stability comes from a variety of places including the feet, ankles, knees, hips, back, abdominals and the overall structural alignment of the spine. Like any physical improvement, being consistent by addressing areas of movement and strength that increase stability and mobility is critical to achieving lasting results. As your Member Coach I encourage you to do something physical every day and include a trip to Greenwood at least three times a week. Incorporate strength training, cardiovascular training, flexibility training, mobility training and now you know the importance of stability training as well. You are worth the effort. Be strong, work on your fitness, incorporate stability training and I promise you will enjoy the fruits of your efforts.

For more information, contact Sheri Warren, Member Coach, Director of Sales and Retention

Five Reasons to Try a Barre Class

Five Reasons to Try a Barre Class

Maybe you have seen one of the flyers at the athletic club, but have you tried a Barre Class yet? Certified Barre Instructor Christine Morris shares five reasons why you should try a Barre class today!

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  1. Our program is unique! The Barre at Greenwood is not a franchised program, which means that we can adapt to the needs of our clients and provide outstanding service. It also allows our instructors the flexibility to vary their exercises, choreography and music so that no two classes, or instructors, are exactly alike. Not to mention, all classes are one hour and limited to 13 participants per class, which creates a fun and personable environment.

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2. You do not need dance experience. Barre is a group fitness class, not a dance class. We incorporate ballet postures, vocabulary and variations into the workout, but they are taught at a level that non-dancers can understand. You will learn to work out with the mind of a dancer. And soon, you’ll have the body of one, too!

 

 

3. Barre focuses on small, isometric movements. You will use your own body weight as resistance and target muscles with small, isometric movements to work them to the point of fatigue. These small motions are how Barre transforms your muscles and gives you a more toned physique.

4. Barre is a music-based class. You will follow the beat; if you’re a music lover, you’re in luck! Music drives a Barre class. All exercises are performed to tempo, and let’s face it, performing exercise to upbeat music is just plain fun.

5. Consistency is key. Continuing to take a Barre class every week will help your form improve. Not only will you get stronger and have a better understanding of the method and the movements, but you will see a positive change in your body. Try a class today!

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Sign up in advance online or at the Service Desk, 303.770.2582 x274. Our class schedule is available online via the Barre Class link.