Best Kept Weight Loss Secrets

1. No carb isn’t the answer
Lowering your carbs is likely beneficial but avoiding carbohydrates all together is unhealthy and unrealistic. Aim to have 30-40% of your calories come from carbohydrates. Make your grains whole and/or sprouted. If you are in a situation that you are unsure if an item is whole, don’t eat it.
2. Protein is not a magical nutrient
No more than 30% of your calories should come from protein. If more than this amount is consumed on a long term basis, your liver will be stressed and you will likely see this in a blood test. In addition, more than this is not beneficial for weight loss, fat loss, muscle gain or energy improvement.water_drinking
3. Chug 20 ounces of water upon waking
Get out of bed. Go to the restroom. Chug your water. Continue with your
morning routine. You will be amazed at the energy, appetite control and reduced brain fog you will have throughout your day.
4. Drink half your body weight in ounces of water, minimum
Get a reusable 32 ounce bottle and calculate how many total bottles you need in a day. Set a daily time line in which it needs to be consumed. For example: two in the morning before lunch (including the water you drink upon waking) and one after lunch before
dinner. Workout water doesn’t count.
5. Never twice in one day or two days in a row
This is Kristin’s Rule of Two that will help you live a lifestyle of guilt-free balance. Use this rule to apply to any part of your healthy lifestyle: portions, unhealthy choices, alcohol, not meeting water goals or not exercising. If you choose something unhealthy at lunch, no treat later in the day. Stay on track the rest of your day and the following day. If you drink alcohol one night, the next day needs to be right on track with water, food and exercise.
6. Think Before You Eat
Take thirty seconds to think about the food before you eat it. Do this with all foods: apples, cucumbers, cookies, alcohol, pasta, etc. Ask yourself 1) how will I feel after I eat this? 2) will this help me reach my goal? This will allow you to attach positive emotions to healthy foods and negative emotions to unhealthy foods, allowing for better control of mind over matter.
7. Eat a minimum of three different veggies per day
We think vegetables are challenging because they are inconvenient. Most veggies need to be chopped, sliced, cooked or dunked in order to taste good. Wrong! Think of the veggies that truly need nothing. Bell peppers, cucumbers, carrots…these need zero preparation. No excuses!
8. Eat every three hours
This is true for most (but not all) people. After four hours, most of us get a dip in blood sugar, then we start to feel the slight signs of low blood sugar and we end up overeating at some point. On the other hand, eating every two hours is likely too close. We never allow our body to be in a “fed” state. This is important for basic metabolism and basic human instinct. It is a good thing to feel a slight bit of hunger, but not a slight bit of low blood sugar. Every time you eat, choose a produce and a protein or healthy fat or fiber.
9. Fruit is not preventing you from losing weight
Choose two per day. I frequently hear that people avoid fruit because of the sugar content. Fruit isn’t the problem and consuming the right amount isn’t preventing you from hitting your health goals.
10. Consistent, daily exercise is a must
There is a big difference between an active lifestyle and exercise and we need both. An active lifestyle is taking the stairs, walking the dog, taking a leisurely bike ride on the Highline Canal or even a nice family hike. Exercise is an organized workout in which your heart rate is elevated for a period of time and is moderate to challenging in intensity for
the time frame you have chosen. These are a few of my biggest secrets! If you need individual help or have questions, please let me know!

Kristin Burgess, Registered Dietitian

The Gamification of Exercise

An example of the current gamification trend is Performance IQ in our cycling classes. By displaying your work on a screen, the instructor can create challenges in class to get more out of each participant, you can view your current level of work in real time and the data is a great motivator! The popular device fitbit™ records movement and counts steps to motivate the individual to move more and sit less.

GATC is introducing another gamification device to our members in MYZONE! This activity tracker/ heart rate monitor records all your workouts and assigns points for your effort and workout. Based on your average heart rate, the device calculates yimages---photos_iphone-mockup-2_800x534our effort level and minutes of activity to assign you MEPs (MYZONE Effort Points.) Those MEPs are then used in challenges to track who is leading, individually or on a team.

Gamification of exercise is more than a screen displaying your output; it is a way to connect with other participants to have fun while staying active. By creating challenges on an app or in social media, people can see where they rank in a challenge and how their effort has elevated their team. These results can be shared on social media and can be viewed by your fellow team mates, holding you accountable for working out and staying consistent. By participating in contests based on your activity and effort, your workouts are more consistent and fun! We are using MYZONE this year for our 2017 Fitness Challenge to help you be accountable and help you achieve your goals.

Accountability and consistency are important keys to attaining the results you’re looking for, but adding FUN to your workouts is important too!

Vic Spatola, Director of Personal Training

Fit Family: the Serenyis

cuteDSC_4696Steve and Christy Serenyis joined GATC ten years ago, just a few months after they were married. Christy: When we moved south of Denver I wanted a good club with some intense classes. I picked GATC primarily because of the class options. We didn’t have children when we first joined, but I had heard the GATC kids programs were really good. I did the Outdoor Fit classes and loved them. A group of five or six of us really bonded last year. We wanted to keep working out really hard so we joined Boxing Babes. Now our group has grown and we participate in PWRFIT with Brandon. I like a teacher that pushes me. PWRFIT has great music and Brandon works us really hard. For Barre, it is the same thing. Christine or Chrissy are both great teachers with some really good high energy flow music.

Steve comes three times a week, Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, and focuses on the weight room and maybe some stair-master work. Christy: The staff in the Kids’ Club is special. They are so understanding and forgiving to the moms when we are tired and dropping off our kids quickly. Not that they know us, it is as simple as opening the door, the kids run in and you run away. I have witnessed crying kids and crying moms with the staff saying “We got this, just go” and I have assured other mothers “they will find you if there is a problem.”

Christy and Steve also speak highly of Little Lobbers instructor, Lisa Thomas. They feel that Lisa is good at engaging even challenging kids. She loves them even when they have bad days as kids do. If Christy wasn’t there at the end of Little Lobbers, Lisa knew she was in a class and took her child back to the Kids Club.

Nine-year old Anna just joined the Greenwood Tiger Shark swim team, but also plays tennis and soccer. Anna likes school (third grade) and is great at everything. MarcuteDSC_4737shall is seven and in second grade. He is an excellent reader, well above his age group. He participated in Little Lobbers with Lisa and has taken Stroke School. Harrison is five and has done a lot here at the club. He is in his third year of Little Lobbers with Lisa. He loves everything and Trish has helped him be really good at swimming.

MacKenzie is the youngest at two and a half. She loves Kids’ Club and taking swim lessons with Trish too. Christy: I often think of my mother’s regret. She wishes now that she had taken time for her own needs while raising children. I tell my friends, take just one hour; your kids will be fine. My husband sees that because I work out, I am a lot happier. I know Steve is happier because he works out and we want our children to find happiness and be healthy too. I like the community here. Since GATC is smaller, a lot of us recognize each other. I think the community creates more respect for each other – it is cleaner, neater and friendlier. I tell people to come here all the time!