Meet our New Trainer Rife Hilgartner

Rife grew up in Baltimore but has lived in Colorado for the last 20 years, primarily in the mountains. He is actively involved in racing in the off road triathlon XTERRA, which is composed of a 1.5 km swim, 30km of mountain biking, and 10 km of running. Rife is very involved with coaching triathlon and teaching Pilates, helping people balance themselves out and move better.

An important part of programming for Rife is strength training, which he believes “is an important component to your total body health. Most people just want to move really well. If you are playing with your kids, you want to be able to play and pick them up properly.”

As Rife points out, everyone is an athlete to some degree, it is important to be involved. While Rife specializes in helping clients train for marathons and cycling, his interest is in helping others train indoors to better prepare for their outside adventures.

Training Indoors for Outside

Being strong indoors can carry over for life. This can be as arduous as skiing, bike riding, running trails, or even just playing in the back yard with your children.

Denver is an active city and the members here at Greenwood Athletic Club want to continue to be active for a long time. “I’m one of those people who believes that age is just a number. With the proper programs and training, you can keep strength, health, fitness and athleticism for your entire life.”

One major area to focus on is the Posterior chain, which is from the back of your head to the bottom of your feet. It’s important to keep this area strong because it’s a major support system. The powerhouse muscles and your core are just as important as that chain, they tie right into that.

Those two systems within the body are important to make strong and to help with posture. A lot of this strengthening is part of the foundation for “Pilates for Dudes,” which demonstrates how Pilates is good for everyone.  Joseph Pilates originally created the work, creating flexibility with length, strength and control. Pilates helps strengthen in muscles you might not have even known existed. What you learn here will translate into other areas.

It’s also important to incorporate in different areas of training and movements, such as weights, yoga, Pilates, cardio, etc. This helps to create different movement patterns and allows you to train different energy systems of the body. If you are spending one day on the treadmill, spend the next on the stair master and a third in the weight room. This means you are channeling different areas to make changes in your body, day-to-day attitude and feelings about life.

Rife is available for one-on-one appointments here at Greenwood Athletic Club. Please feel free to message him HERE or check out his personal website howfittraining.com.

@Instagram https://www.instagram.com/howfittraining/

@Facebook https://www.facebook.com/rife.hilgartner

Meet our New Trainer Bri Gerwitz!

Bri_GerwitzWhile Bri Gerwitz grew up playing sports, it was her weight loss journey starting in 2010 that really helped to inspire her fitness career. The drive of that experience pushed her to want to learn more about the fitness world and to educate and share with other her knowledge and experience. Her trainer interests lie primarily with functional movement orientation, and while she’s certified in Yoga, her interest also lies in helping others who are interested in doing extreme sports. Here are some of her suggestions for movements that will help you conquer the great outdoors.

Rock Climbing

It is important to try out movements before engaging in activities. With Rock Climbing, since you do so much pulling with rock climbing, it’s important to do core stabilization with pushing. This means you will be balancing the body as well as balancing the muscles. To help with this you want to incorporate in some short circuit work such as single leg deadlifts or single leg box jumps. As Bri points out, “you don’t always have a good two-foot grasp while you are rock climbing. This means being able to utilize one foot in a dynamic and then controlled manner is going to help get into and out of a situation on a rock.”

From there, focus on the core, doing exercises such as planks and isometric holds which you might use while rock climbing; this allows you to condition your body for holding. Bri also suggests some dynamic moves while in a plank position, such as skier abs or rotations. These moves are demonstrative, and working on your core in the gym will help you utilize that power.

Kayaking

Here you want to think about a full body workout with oblique’s . It’s important to strengthen your oblique’s with twisting to get a good hit snap to roll back over from a dive/roll out of the kayak. Exercise wise, this might include some cable tucks and rotations from upper and lower body. High rows and chest flies will also help you keep leverage and power when you are awkwardly trying to maneuver around rocks, helping you use the full range of motion from your shoulders.

You also want to focus on chest and shoulders, especially with mobility. It will help to bring in some yoga and mobility work to strengthen these areas because when you can move in the same fashion in different directions, it forces smaller muscles to move when the larger ones are fatigued. This is why exercises such as matrix push-ups, pull ups and rows are going to prepare you outside of the gym.

 

Backpacking or Hiking a 14er

13925113_10157241740120099_6657487935517397989_nHere it’s important to build your lower body strength, such as incorporating in single leg lunges and balancing with weights during your workouts. This helps you get used to a path. Balancing work will help with your footing, when there’s so much exposure outdoors to the unknown. It also will help you deal with what it’s like to be up above the tree line. If you are prepared for the uneasy and shifting of your surroundings with the rocks and boulders, that is going to help you feel better prepared. Endurance and strength are also essential, which means building your core strength. You might engage with some balance reaches, on one leg with a plate or kettlebell to reach down and all the way back up. This helps activate your muscles, and will lead to more strength within the movement.

Bri is now available to work with our Greenwood Athletic Clients one-one-one. Please contact her HERE, or add her on social media: Facebook, Instagram

 

You can also check out her Flex & Function class, which works to strengthen superficial muscles and deep core muscles.

Flex and Function

Recreational Cycling Coaching

Jennifer Schumm

In the 11 years that I have been riding my bike, I have found cycling to be one of the things I am most passionate about in life. I love where the bike takes me to and what all I get to see in the world ON MY BIKE!  The most amazing scenery one could ever experience happens on a bike.  The bike, besides bringing wonderful happiness and passion to enrich our lives, also offers another tool of exercise that is quite euphoric! No wonder so many people love riding a bike!

Jennschumm1I have found in all my years of riding and racing, the people who need the most help from a coaching standpoint are recreational cyclists. I have been asked many questions throughout my years of cycling about things like: “how do I know when to get out of the saddle and for how long?”, “How do I shift gears while riding in my drops and when do I shift gears? “, “How do I know which gearing  to use on different hills and terrain and how do I learn varying techniques and positions for riding my bike in order to be the most efficient cyclist, all while having fun? “How do I ride with groups and how do I learn the skills required to ride with groups?”

What’s it like getting started with a recreational cycling coach? When I first start working with a recreational rider, we go on a bike ride of their choice, and I just ride with them, looking at their position on their bike, how their bike fits them, etc. I make recommendations based on what I see, and then we go from there. I see how they ride on the flats, short hills, long hills, sustained climbs, etc. and I make suggestions as to the position they should ride in and gearing they should choose as we are riding all these various terrains. It can be as simple as me telling them what gear to be in, what position to be on in and for how long, and then what position to change into and gearing to change into as we ride.  I also have them work on varying cadence and effort drills as well as attacks, sprinting, power efforts, pace lining, descending skills, and skills required to ride with other people and in groups.

When I work with a client, I want to teach you which tools you need in your toolbox for bike riding, as well as show you how to ride better by yourself but also how to ride better with other people and groups. These are all skills that need to be learned. I also teach skills for descending, pack riding, pace lining, sprinting, attacking etc. These are all important skills that I believe recreational riders need to learn too because you never know when you are riding with a group of friends and somebody attacks you OR you are the one who attacks them because you want to get to the top of the hill first? It’s always fun to be competitive.

When I work one-on-one with you, I will suggest certain drills to work on based on what your weakest areas are, which I want to encourage you to improve on. I will give you specific drills to do while on the ride. This is great because its personal training, but on the bike.

JennandDadI also have people say to me,: “I just want to be faster on my bike so I can beat my friends in the local century, or get up squaw pass or high grade faster, “I just don’t want to be the last person that gets dropped riding in our group of friends,” or “I also don’t want to be completely exhausted in the middle of the ride either.”  This is why teaching a recreational cyclist all the different techniques and positions  you can ride your bike with varying  weather, temperatures, and wind conditions is SO important! Life changing! It allows you to maintain speed, maintain covering distances at a certain speed without getting dropped. Having many positions and techniques to ride your bike on all the different kinds of terrain out there on these Colorado at nationwide roads is very important. The body needs to be able to recover certain muscles while other ones are being used and vice versa. Not to mention that being able to change bike positions, technique and different cadences or different positions on the bike helps keep your body fresh and helps keep those muscles that are working, working! All this keeps fatigue at bay and FULL GAS at large!

I would also suggest if you aren’t already using it STRAVA, give it a try because it takes your recreational biking experience to a whole new level! A few new levels! Everyone likes a reason to compete and likes to show off to their friends, but they also like to compete against themselves and see that their times are improving, they’re getting more PR’s, etc. STRAVA offers results that shows how you are getting faster. Everyone loves the feeling of beating their friends or competitors on any type of terrain whether it’s a Hillclimb, Sprint to a stop sign, or lead pack that you didn’t get dropped from, the list goes on. 

RecreationCyclist flyer

Bikes are like well manicured high-octane sports cars. You are not going to drive a car like that at one speed on one terrain.   You are going to use all the cool gadgets and gizmos and toys that car is made with. Same thing on a bike. It just takes someone to show you how to use all those toys and gadgets and gizmos to go faster but also how to a have more fun and that is one thing I do.  I’m here to teach you how to get the most efficient riding out of your bike as well as the most efficient aero dynamic and overall riding experience.

 

 

I would love to work more with you, feel free to email me at jennifers@GreenwoodATC.com to learn more about how I can help take your recreation cycling to a new level!

 

Welcome our New Trainer Kim Galbreath!

20264995_713648495503418_3625582752079758281_n

You have probably seen Kim at Greenwood Athletic Club over the past year, her smile is hard to miss as you walk into the athletic club. We are excited to have her fully on board as a new Personal Trainer here at Greenwood! Kim’s path to becoming a personal trainer started in 2013 when she embarked on her own weight loss journey. While she embarked on her own journey without the help of a personal trainer or a professional diet plan, she committed to making sure that others would not have to go at it alone. Kim reiterates that there’s no secret to getting healthy, eating right and exercise are a very powerful combination. Yet on her journey to getting there, she wants to make sure that others have some important and helpful advice to find the motivation to get started.

011

Don’t Do It Alone

Losing weight is not a sprint, it is a little sweat, but a lot of patience and forgiveness with yourself. Your weight loss and exercise journey is largely about understanding your own physical and metal balance, and the best thing you can do is to have a trainer there by your side to help you each step of the way.

Weight Training is Your Friend

A lot of people will immediately turn to cardio as a way of shedding those unwanted pounds. However, its not just cardio that you need, but also weight training. Going alone into the weight room can be overwhelming, but if you have the help and guidance from a trainer, especially one like myself who’s been through that exact moment, then it will help you gain confidence not just in the weight room, but in day-to-day activities. There’s a place for every shape and size in the weight room.

As you are starting out, I would encourage calisthenic body weight movements.  For anything that you’re uncomfortable or unable to do like starting out, there are always scaling options. For example, if you aren’t ready to dive into box jumps, you can do step ups, lunges or squats. As you progress, you want to make the use of dumbbells and barbells a top goal, as they are the best way to get the most out of each movement.

cropped-MG_7795

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make Nutrition a Priority

Create an eating routine, so that you are eating at the same time, and the same food. Try to pre-plan what you are going to each day, and set yourself up for success at the start of the week. You are more likely to follow a plan if you have it laid out first. 

Try Something New, Like Boxing or Obstacle Running

Boxing is both a cardio workout, and a great way to de-stress. It kicks your heart rate up, and wearing the gloves means that you are also building up some strength. Boxing targets a different type of muscle fiber than strength training because it requires a quick response. There’s also learning technique and strategies, which requires mental engagements, and provides for an all-around great workout.

18951353_10104494660356719_3095219690349444656_n

Obstacle Running is a great example of an outdoor activity that will push you firmly outside of your comfort zone. Comfort does not always equal happiness, and if you try something new, it helps increase your overall confidence at the gym, at work, or at home. Sometimes you don’t know what you will fall in love with doing exercise wise, until you give it a try.

 

Kim is now available for one-on-one training sessions here at Greenwood, you can schedule appointments with her HERE.

You can also find Kim in the Combat Zone for Boxing Classes! View that schedule HERE

Be sure to read more about Kim’s journey on her personal website, http://www.yogapantsdiary.com.

 

Meet our New Trainer Lindsey Green!

Lyndsey_webOriginally from Oklahoma, Lindsey was drawn to Colorado’s environment and people.  Lindsey is passionate about helping clients learn more about functional varied movements with high intensity. As she explains, its important to have different workouts and different ways of using weights to get the most out of your workout. Wondering what a workout with Lindsey might look like? Take a look!

Getting a Workout Off of the Machine: Functional Varied Movement Workout

Warm Up: Jump on a rowing machine for 3-5 minutes to warm up your body. You can stretch out your body a bit doing inchworms and banded stretches.

Start with a Strength Movement: Starting with strength allows you to warm your body up and get the most out of your strength work for that day. It’s helpful for people to know their one rep max so that I can work off of percentages with them. For example, one day we might do 80% of a back squat with low reps, another day we might do 50% with a higher rep volume. Allowing for this variety in weight percentage and reps will help you get stronger because you’re building endurance over time. It’s not always about going super heavy, but it’s important to know where you are at. Not to mention, Knowing your 1 Rep Max is a good measure of strength and progress.

FullSizeRender 5

Deadlifts are also a great strength movement, but can be challenging to do properly. It’s helpful to start with kettlebell deadlifts, or siting on a box so that you are not fully squatting. Picking up objects from the ground is an important functional movement that is good for everyone, both inside and outside of the gym.

Conditioning: Depending on each client, there are a variety of conditioning methods to cycle through. For example, I often times have clients do burpees, wall balls, or full body movements to help elevate their heart rate. I am also a huge advocate of jump roping, its’ not only a great cardio but it’s a full body movement that’s working your legs, your forearms and your core which you need to keep tight while you jump.

IMG_7506

Scale Your Movements: The best part about having a trainer is having someone in your corner who can assess and re-asses what your body needs. Modifications can always be made to make sure you are getting the most out of your workout, in a way that encourages muscle progression and deters injuries.

Don’t go too long: You are getting more out of your work out in a short amount of time than you would be on a cardio machine. Non-machine workouts help you build muscle endurance, which in turn will help you burn more calories throughout the day. When you can get your heart rate at an elevated state, and work through time intervals, then you can maximize your time. If you only have an hour to get your workout in, functional varied movement workouts make sure you are getting the most out of your hour.

Lindsey is available for one-on-one appointments here at Greenwood, you can contact her by clicking here, or on her Instagram @lindseygreeen.

Also, keep an eye out for her new High Intensity Conditioning Class, starting September 26 thru October 19.

How to Achieve Optimal Chair Positioning at Your Desk

By Sara Talbert

As a Pilates instructor, I think of myself as a teacher of posture. When my clients walk in the door, I look at their posture and ask myself, “what are the best exercises for this person today?” When I teach Spin classes, my cues always involve “sitting tall” and “keep your neck” meaning don’t let your shoulders take over your upper body. When I ask my clients what they think is causing their back pain, they often reply with “sitting at my desk.”

Your chair is perhaps the single most important part of a healthy working environment. I’ve put together some guidelines for achieving optimal chair positioning for long hours at your desk.

1. THE BASICS

You should be able to sit comfortably in the chair, using as much of the chair back as possible for support. The lumbar support should fit comfortably into the curve of your lower back and your feet should be flat on the ground (use a footrest if necessary).

Posture Image 32. CHAIR HEIGHT

Start with your seat at the highest setting and then adjust downward until your legs and feet feel comfortable and the back of your knees are at an open angle (90° or slightly greater and not compressed).

Posture 1

3. SIT BACK IN THE CHAIR

Adjust the height and/or depth of the lumbar support to provide comfortable lower back support.

 

 

4. ADJUST THE RECLINE

If the chair has a recline lock, set this at a comfortable position. Remember to unlock this periodically allowing the backrest to move with your back as you change posture. It’s generally better to be slightly reclined, as this helps relieve tension from your lower back. If the chair allows you to, adjust the recline tension as you move back and forth so that the chair provides consistent support.

5. ADJUST THE SEAT PAN

When sitting back, make any adjustments to the seat pan (e.g., seat pan tilt) to reach a comfortable position. The seat pan should extend about an inch on both sides of your legs and should not apply pressure to the back of your knees.

6. ADJUST THE ARMREST

If possible, adjust the height, width and position of your armrests to one most comfortable for how you work. Keep in mind that armrests will be used only between typing sessions, not while typing or using your mouse. Consider lowering or swinging the armrests out of the way when not in use so as to not inhibit your movement.

Poster Image 2 Arm Rest

7. CLEAR OBSTACLES

Make sure that the chair casters (wheels) move smoothly and that nothing obstructs your ability to position the chair in front of your desk and computer. Lastly, try and get up frequently and walk around. Find the water station at the other end of your work space to fill up your bottle. Your body will thank you.

SaraTalbert1

 

To learn more about posture, check out our schedule for available Pilates classes at Greenwood Athletic Club, or contact Sara Talbert for more information.

The Key to Exercising? It’s Balance!

When the media describes a new fitness trend or training method, they advertise that this is the best new way to train.  Whether it is long duration/low intensity, high intensity interval training or weight training only, each proclaim to be the best. Running from one extreme or another inevitably leads to short-term gain but long-term ruin. Let’s look at the facts versus the fads

1. SAID means Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demand. This means “you get what you train for and nothing else.” For example, if all you do is lift weights and do not train for any form of endurance, you will be able to work up to two minutes and then fatigue out. The same is true for endurance-only training in a steady state; you are not powerful at any level.

DSC_1149

2. Flexibility, but more precisely being able to move within a greater range of motion, is wonderful. But if you have no strength in that range of motion, all you have done is stretch ligaments and joint capsules and have not created a strong and stable joint to increase range of motion.

3. Neurological adaptation is a principle that says the more you perform a movement, the more efficient you become at that movement. The more efficient you become, the less calories you burn at that activity.

4. The larger your muscle, the more calories you burn, the better you look and the better bone density you have. So where does this leave us? Here are some principled suggestions to change your training regime:

Balance what you do. Do less intense cardio one to two days a week for 45 minutes or longer. Do cardiovascular intervals, going to a higher heart rate, up to two days a week. Lift weights to failure two to three days a week. Work on some type of range of motion training one to two days a week.

Key to Balance 2

Train using periodization. Have a goal for a 12-week training cycle. Within that cycle, make two week micro cycles where you vary your workouts with a specific purpose. The first two weeks can be focused on stability (Yoga, lighter weights and stability ball work, Pilates.) The second two weeks can be focused on strength building by doing sets to failure. The third two weeks can be power movements (Olympic lifting, HIIT and Spinning.) Then you repeat the three phases.

REST! Every athlete needs an off-season. Rest and recovery is sometimes the thing you need after training hard for an event or an 8-12 week workout cycle. Recover by also doing massage, trigger point or Rolfing. Resting between intense bouts of exercise is needed, so make sure you have a rest day somewhere in your week.

Key to Balance 3Balance in exercise, diet and lifestyle is key to longevity and happiness. Any of our personal trainers would be happy to meet with you and talk about what kind of balance works best for you. Please contact Vic Spatola, Director of Personal Training, or look through our Personal Training page for more information.

 

Easy Ways to Improve Your Stability

BosulungeThe basic definition of the word stability is “the state of being stable, firm, solid, steady and secure”. Something that is unstable is considered to be weak, uncertain or wavering. I don’t know about you but I want more of my life to be defined by being solid and steady as opposed to weak and wavering. Your body is a tool that when taken care of and trained properly, can improve your physical stability, allowing you to enjoy the things you value longer and more confidently.

In the fitness world, stability typically means strong and steady. Being stable is critical when creating power and improving athletic performance. With greater stability comes improvements in furthering a Yoga practice, or lifting heavier weights in all three planes of motion. Greater stability allows for simple functional balance to be maintained doing normal daily activities like squatting, standing, lifting and twisting, all movements that are critical to longevity and overall health. Plus, stability improves balance, especially when outside forces seek to overthrow it.

At Greenwood there are lots of activities to incorporate into a weekly routine to improve overall stability. We are here to help you create a strong, solid, secure foundation from which you can enjoy the things you like to do most….hiking, cycling, golfing, gardening, and swimming. Try one of Greenwood’s complimentary classes designed to specifically address these areas. Examples include willPower & Grace, CXWORX, Total Body Fit, Yoga, Mat Pilates and more. Hiring a personal trainer or Pilates instructor to develop a personalized workout plan that addresses the type of stability and mobility you need to reach your personal goals is another fantastic way to make a difference in your overall function and performance.

Stability comes from a variety of places including the feet, ankles, knees, hips, back, abdominals and the overall structural alignment of the spine. Like any physical improvement, being consistent by addressing areas of movement and strength that increase stability and mobility is critical to achieving lasting results. As your Member Coach I encourage you to do something physical every day and include a trip to Greenwood at least three times a week. Incorporate strength training, cardiovascular training, flexibility training, mobility training and now you know the importance of stability training as well. You are worth the effort. Be strong, work on your fitness, incorporate stability training and I promise you will enjoy the fruits of your efforts.

For more information, contact Sheri Warren, Member Coach, Director of Sales and Retention

Five Reasons to Try a Barre Class

Five Reasons to Try a Barre Class

Maybe you have seen one of the flyers at the athletic club, but have you tried a Barre Class yet? Certified Barre Instructor Christine Morris shares five reasons why you should try a Barre class today!

Barre 1

  1. Our program is unique! The Barre at Greenwood is not a franchised program, which means that we can adapt to the needs of our clients and provide outstanding service. It also allows our instructors the flexibility to vary their exercises, choreography and music so that no two classes, or instructors, are exactly alike. Not to mention, all classes are one hour and limited to 13 participants per class, which creates a fun and personable environment.

IMG_2837

 

2. You do not need dance experience. Barre is a group fitness class, not a dance class. We incorporate ballet postures, vocabulary and variations into the workout, but they are taught at a level that non-dancers can understand. You will learn to work out with the mind of a dancer. And soon, you’ll have the body of one, too!

 

 

3. Barre focuses on small, isometric movements. You will use your own body weight as resistance and target muscles with small, isometric movements to work them to the point of fatigue. These small motions are how Barre transforms your muscles and gives you a more toned physique.

4. Barre is a music-based class. You will follow the beat; if you’re a music lover, you’re in luck! Music drives a Barre class. All exercises are performed to tempo, and let’s face it, performing exercise to upbeat music is just plain fun.

5. Consistency is key. Continuing to take a Barre class every week will help your form improve. Not only will you get stronger and have a better understanding of the method and the movements, but you will see a positive change in your body. Try a class today!

IMG_2840

Sign up in advance online or at the Service Desk, 303.770.2582 x274. Our class schedule is available online via the Barre Class link.

Tips for a Fun, Active Summer!

With the kids out of school, summer is the perfect season for changing up your routine. GATC offers rich opportunities for fitness and fun. Whether you discover some new time for yourself, with friends or time as a family, we have over 130 complimentary group fitness classes a week to choose from.

Kid Working OutDid you know that our youth policy allows you to bring your son or daughter with you to a class? What a great way to connect with your child/teen/young adult and establish healthy fitness habits. They must be at least nine years old and in direct visual and speaking contact with a supervising and responsible adult member 18 years of age or older. Your 14-year-old can arrange to become youth certified and use the club without your supervision.

So where should you start? Change up your routine or introduce a new one for your friends/family. Pick some activities that you’ve always wanted to try. Treat yourself to a 30 minute CXWORX class, which is a 30 minute revolutionary core training. This dynamic workout will challenge your abs, glutes, back, obliques and “slings” connecting the upper and lower body, toning core muscles and improving functional strength.

Why not try an hour of Spinning? Or you might enjoy one of our many cardio, strength, or mind-body classes or experience the Barre at Greenwood. Our early morning Summer Boot Camp is a great opportunity to beat the heat, enjoy the beautiful outdoors and find extra motivation to drive yourself to the next fitness level. There’s something for everyone and the advantage of group fitness is that you are more likely to push yourself harder and be more consistent in a group setting than on your own.

If you have any questions, please be sure to contact Andrea Morris, Director of Group Fitness